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Huawei Watch 2 Sport Smartwatch


Huawei Watch 2 smart Watch integrates cutting-edge technology with the look of a Classic sports Watch. Designed to work in harmony with your smartphone or Independently, new features include: standalone GPS navigation, professional running Coach, offline music storage, Wear OS by Google/Android Wear and various apps.

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Huawei Watch 2 Sports Smartwatch – Ceramic Bezel – Carbon Black Strap 

The headline feature undoubtedly is the Watch 2 Sport’s ability to work independently, without the need for a smartphone. Every version of the watch has GPS, so you can go on a run and have it track your pace and location accurately, but the 4G facility is the cherry on the cake, allowing you to field phone calls and reply to text messages, too. You need to install a nano-SIM card in the tray beneath the bottom strap attachment, but once you’ve done that, you can use the watch’s built-in microphone and speaker to dial out and answer calls, while Android Wear 2’s new smart replies, dictation and onscreen keyboard let you answer and send texts directly from the watch face.

 

To be honest, we are not entirely sure why you’d want to answer the phone while you are out on your daily run, but at least there’s the option. And if you don’t think you want or need the 4G connectivity, the non-4G version is cheaper and offers everything else you need for fitness tracking, with built-in GPS and a heart-rate monitor to keep tabs on your ticker. And there’s plenty to like about the rest of the specification as well. Both variants have a circular 1.2in, 390 x 390 AMOLED display with an ambient light sensor that adjusts brightness automatically. This display is sharp and colourful and it is just a shame Huawei’s stock faces are so unsophisticated in appearance.

Both variants are powered by the new 1.1GHz Snapdragon Wear 2100 processor – Qualcomm’s first dedicated wearables chip – and each has 768MB of RAM, which is plenty for a smartwatch. There’s also 4GB of internal storage so you can store music on the watch and listen directly via Bluetooth headphones, NFC so you can use Android Pay from your wrist and, perhaps most important of all, a large 420mAh battery, delivering a 40% increase in capacity over the first-generation Huawei Watch.

Overall, we were pleased with the performance of the hardware. The screen is bright and sharp when you need it to be and it dims to a level where it doesn’t blind you in the middle of the night. Sometimes we did experience the odd pause and delay here and there when swiping round screens, but this is something a firmware update will resolve in time.

Battery life is fine. We found that by disabling Wi-Fi and sticking just to Bluetooth, it would last two working days comfortably. It didn’t quite stretch to a full 48 hours, and enabling 4G dropped the battery life to around a day, but the watch’s ultra-battery-saving mode, which disables all functions apart from step counting and the watch face, will get you to the end of the day however long is left of it.

 

Both the Huawei Watch 2 Classic and Sport have a slightly bulky design and we find it odd that Huawei hasn’t included a rotating bezel or crown, instead offering two push buttons on the right-hand edge of the watch casing. It’s a slightly odd design choice since the Android Wear 2 interface has been specifically designed with this type of hardware in mind. Still, the Watch 2 is attractive to look at. The Watch 2 Classic is the best-looking variant, all encased in brushed stainless steel, but we also have a soft spot for the sports model’s glossy black ceramic bezel. There’s something brooding and high-tech about it that the standard watch just doesn’t have.

We do find the Watch 2 a little bulky, though. Despite being lightweight at only 40g for the Sport and 47g for the Classic (without straps), the Huawei Watch 2 is 12.6mm thick and it looks bulky on my wrist. There are several different colour straps available, but whichever you choose, the textured plastic doesn’t look very nice. Another surprising design choice by Huawei was to reduce the visible screen size from 1.4in down to 1.2in in the Watch 2. It’s a small difference, but noticeable if you compare the two versions together.

The smaller screen also puts a bit of dampener on the Huawei Watch’s next great feature: Android Wear 2. That’s because among Wear 2’s best new features is an onscreen keyboard that allows you to swipe out words, just like you do on your smartphone. In general, we have been impressed by Android Wear 2’s ease of use and accessibility. It’s much more intuitive to use than the previous version, and it’s relatively simple to understand how things work.

Its biggest update, however, is standalone apps. The theory here is that by installing some to the watch directly, you’ll be able to use the watch on its own without the need for a paired smartphone at all. For example, you’d be able to listen to your online playlists or get your email even if you left your smartphone at home. Useful if you own the 4G version of the Huawei Watch 2, or for iPhone owners who want to use something other than an Apple Watch. While the Huawei fitness app worked on the watch without a phone present, and I was able to install Google Maps to local storage and use it for directions, Spotify refused to work without my smartphone being present and Gmail couldn’t be installed directly, either.

One thing that will make an impact from the off is the way Android Wear 2 now supports Android Pay from your wrist. Once you’ve set this up and authenticated the watch, you can access the feature with a double-press of the bottom side button. We found this worked but was a little slow on the uptake, particularly in comparison to Apple Pay on the Apple Watch. It took a little longer than I’d like to read at contactless payment terminals. We also found it to freeze from time to time, making it slightly frustrating to have to re-launch the app.

 

We love the Google Assistant implementation in Android Wear 2. In particular, it seems far more responsive than the voice recognition on previous Android Wear smartwatches we’ve worn, and the dictation feature, which can be used in preference to the keyboard feature for replying to and writing texts and other messages, works absolutely beautifully for the most part.

Despite having an onboard GPS and heart-rate monitor, fitness is an area where I’m not entirely convinced by the Huawei Watch 2. It comes with its own Huawei-branded fitness app that delivers everything from training plans to on-watch guided workouts. It tracks all sorts of metrics, displays a neat graph on the watch itself of your heart rate during exercise and estimated VO2 capacity (among other things), and it works well in conjunction with the watch’s heart-rate monitor and GPS sensor. However, for all its fancy features, I found the Huawei Health app misses out one key thing: it doesn’t make any attempt to auto-detect fitness activities. While this isn’t a problem if you’re planning on using it to go running with, as that’s a distinct and easily defined activity, you want activity such as brisk walks to be detected without intervention, since you don’t always know when a light stroll will turn into something more demanding.

There are some irritations, then, with the Huawei Watch 2, but in general, we like it. The battery life is good, we like the look of both variants, and it’s packed with all the sensors you could possibly need. Android Wear 2 makes it simple to use and adds the ability to use Android Pay, and despite the weaknesses of the Huawei Wear app, it is undoubtedly a bonus to be able to cut loose from your smartphone and go on a run without it. As a whole a good looking (popular) and solid smartwatch.

  • Build Quality
  • Performance
  • Features
  • Accuracy
4.7

Summary

The Huawei Watch 2 is something of a surprise package: great for on-the-go independent control without a phone thanks to (optional) 4G, well built and full of top-spec hardware and features. Overall, what the Huawei Watch 2 does is have a jolly good go at things. It misses the exuberance and the sporting prowess of other (more expensive) smart/ sport watches, but as a smartwatch that will deal well with sports, it’s actually pretty good in many areas.

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At a glance

  • Built-in GPS and continuous heart rate: monitor your heart rate and track your workout routes without your phone
  • Scientific sleep tracking: HUAWEI TruSleep keeps track of light, deep and REM sleep stages to make your sleep truly restful
  • Workout Coach: get real-time guidance and workout data such as recovery time and Vo2 Max
  • NFC and Google assistant: make payments and have a personal voice assistant from your wrist
  • Music and power: download and listen to music with Google Play Music on your watch. You can optimize power consumption settings to get the most out of your device. 
  • Build Quality
  • Performance
  • Features
  • Accuracy
4.7

Summary

The Huawei Watch 2 is something of a surprise package: great for on-the-go independent control without a phone thanks to (optional) 4G, well built and full of top-spec hardware and features. Overall, what the Huawei Watch 2 does is have a jolly good go at things. It misses the exuberance and the sporting prowess of other (more expensive) smart/ sport watches, but as a smartwatch that will deal well with sports, it’s actually pretty good in many areas.

Sending
User Review
0 (0 votes)
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